Tag: books

Jelly Bean’s Library

Note: This is the first of a series of posts that will appear from time to time dealing with personal libraries, whether real or fictional.

In his short story, “The Jelly Bean,” which appears in the collection, Tales of the Jazz Age,  F. Scott Fitzgerald describes Jim Powell’s bedroom above Tilly’s garage, where he works part-time, in a fictional Georgia city of 40,000 people.

Tales of the Jazz Age
Cover of the First Edition. Wikimedia Commons

“It was a cheerless square of a room, punctuated with a bed and a battered table on which lay half a dozen books—Joe Miller’s Slow Train Thru Arkansas, Lucille, in an old edition very much annotated in an old fashioned hand; The Eyes of the World by Harold Bell Wright, and an ancient prayer book of the Church of England with the name Alice Powell and the date 1831 written on the fly-leaf.” Continue reading “Jelly Bean’s Library”

All the lonely people Where do they all come from?

*Please note that the following essay does not apply to my regular customers, or new customers who have serious questions about books, prices, etc. I enjoy conversing with my regular customers, new customers, people traveling through, etc.

There are a lot of lonely people in upstate New York, mostly men, whose loneliness seems to be self created, drowning the people nice enough to lend them an ear in a tsunami of words and whose own ears are stopped up so they never know what you are saying even if they come up for air, which they rarely do. They seek out small business owners and sole proprietors, monopolizing their time, sometimes buying something, most of the time not. Continue reading “All the lonely people Where do they all come from?”

Dear Schenectady Gazette – Ignoring Books is Worse than Burning Them

Dear Editor:

1031180903a_HDR-1I was excited today (October 27, 2018) to receive my copy of the Official 2018 Peoples Choice Awards Best of the Best insert in my Schenectady Gazette. Thumbing through it, I found the Best Gun Shop and the Best Vape Shop. But conspicuous by its absence was THE BEST BOOKSTORE category. Continue reading “Dear Schenectady Gazette – Ignoring Books is Worse than Burning Them”

When bloody wankers ask for discounts

(This is an excerpt from Nothing Much Happens, Diary of an Upstate Bookseller, a work in progress.)

New customer from the UK in today, a verbal salad shooter, manure spreader. “Bloody” this and “bloody” that and George W. Bush is a wanker. Obama is a wanker too, and John Wayne was a bloody wanker. Most of the the time I could understand him, but sometimes I needed subtitles.

He comes to the States once a year, entering from Canada with a suitcase full of hundred dollar bills to buy vintage cars and parts to ship back to the Island to sell at a profit. His name is Ford*, but he buys and repatriates Triumphs, Austin Healys and MGs not Mustangs.

No Discount Sign

Then the dreaded question, which I’m never prepared for, “Do you give discounts?” Continue reading “When bloody wankers ask for discounts”

September Hours and September Sale

book sale logo (1)

THE BOOK HOUND WILL ONLY BE OPEN ON THURSDAYS, FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS DURING SEPTEMBER. OTHER DAYS BY APPOINTMENT OR CHANCE. HOWEVER, ALL USED BOOKS AND OTHER USED ITEMS WILL BE DISCOUNTED BY 20% DURING SEPTEMBER.*

*Consignment, items on reserve and layaway items not included in sale. A few other items are also excluded. Discount cannot be combined with any coupon or other discount. Continue reading “September Hours and September Sale”

Antisocial Media – How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy. A Review.

Without denying the social media site Facebook has some value, Siva Vaidhyanathan makes a strong case for Facebook’s overall destructive nature in his latest book, Antisocial Media How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy. (Oxford University Press, 2018.) Influenced by Neil Postman, the educator and critic whose best known book, Amusing Ourselves to Death (1985), made a similar case against television, Vaidhyanathan’s book describes and decries the addictive quality of Facebook as well as its shallowness. Continue reading “Antisocial Media – How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy. A Review.”

When Saying “They All Look Alike” is not Racism. The Five Chinese Brothers & the Dionne Quintuplets.

There are few children’s books more charming and fun to read than Claire Huchet Bishop’s The Five Chinese Brothers, illustrated by Kurt Wiese and published in 1938. Like so many ethnic stories, critics have accused the book of ethnic and racial stereotyping. While most critics of the book have focused on Kurt Wiese’s illustrations, a few have criticized the text itself.

5 Chinese BrothersAmy Bronwen Zemser, who describes herself as “writer, squirrel hunter, breastfeeder, homosexual,” and has had some children’s books published, says of The Five Chinese Brothers which was the subject of her September 13, 2013 blog post, “The first sentence alone is problematic.” The first sentence of the book reads, “Once upon a time there were Five Chinese Brothers and they all looked exactly alike.” Zemser’s implication is that the book implies that all Chinese look alike. Continue reading “When Saying “They All Look Alike” is not Racism. The Five Chinese Brothers & the Dionne Quintuplets.”