Category: books

Lock 11 Media dba the Book Hound to Focus on Mohawk Valley Reprints

Lock 11 Media LLC was formed by Dan Weaver, owner of the Book Hound, in 2017 in order to provide virtually all book related services, but particularly publishing. One of the goals of Lock 11 Media is to reprint historical and genealogical books related to the Mohawk Valley. With that goal in mind, we have reprinted our first two volumes: The Eckler Family of the Mohawk Valley, an 82 page soft cover retailing for $9.99 and Captain John Brown, His Service in the Revolutionary War, Battle of Stone Arabia: An Address Delivered before the Oneida Historical Society, April 28, 1884. The book is a 24 page soft cover and retails for $7.99.

These books are already available for sale at amazon.com. Click on the links to purchase them from amazon. We have ordered copies for The Book Hound, and they should arrive soon. We also will make copies available at a reduced rate for other booksellers and non-profit organizations that sell books. Continue reading “Lock 11 Media dba the Book Hound to Focus on Mohawk Valley Reprints”

Jelly Bean’s Library

Note: This is the first of a series of posts that will appear from time to time dealing with personal libraries, whether real or fictional.

In his short story, “The Jelly Bean,” which appears in the collection, Tales of the Jazz Age,  F. Scott Fitzgerald describes Jim Powell’s bedroom above Tilly’s garage, where he works part-time, in a fictional Georgia city of 40,000 people.

Tales of the Jazz Age
Cover of the First Edition. Wikimedia Commons

“It was a cheerless square of a room, punctuated with a bed and a battered table on which lay half a dozen books—Joe Miller’s Slow Train Thru Arkansas, Lucille, in an old edition very much annotated in an old fashioned hand; The Eyes of the World by Harold Bell Wright, and an ancient prayer book of the Church of England with the name Alice Powell and the date 1831 written on the fly-leaf.” Continue reading “Jelly Bean’s Library”

On Selling a Revolutionary War book to the CIA

The CIA had a problem. The world’s most powerful spy agency with its own military, bigger than most militaries in the world, owed me $5.53 but couldn’t figure out how to pay me. It would take more than three years for them to solve the problem. They had toppled governments in less time.

It all began in August 2011 when the CIA’s Open Source Center ordered a $100 book from me. I shipped it to them on August 5. On August 9, it was returned to me stamped “REFUSED.” Continue reading “On Selling a Revolutionary War book to the CIA”

New York Review of Books Commits Intellectual Suicide

With Ian Buruma’s Resignation NYRB goes where it has never gone before

Daniel T. Weaver

Near the end of Katherine Anne Porter’s short novel, Noon Wine, the main character, Royal Earle Thompson, recently acquitted of murder, rides around the county attempting to justify his behavior to his neighbors. At his last stop, he says to Mr. McClellan, “Well, as I reckon you happen to know, I’ve had some strange troubles lately, and, as the feller says, it’s not the kind of trouble that happens to a man every day in the year, and there’s some things I don’t want no misunderstanding about in the neighbors’ minds, so—” Continue reading “New York Review of Books Commits Intellectual Suicide”

Dear Schenectady Gazette – Ignoring Books is Worse than Burning Them

Dear Editor:

1031180903a_HDR-1I was excited today (October 27, 2018) to receive my copy of the Official 2018 Peoples Choice Awards Best of the Best insert in my Schenectady Gazette. Thumbing through it, I found the Best Gun Shop and the Best Vape Shop. But conspicuous by its absence was THE BEST BOOKSTORE category. Continue reading “Dear Schenectady Gazette – Ignoring Books is Worse than Burning Them”